Justice 4 ALL Madeleine McCann Family
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GMTV interview, in full.

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GMTV interview, in full.

Post by vee8 on Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:44 am

http://www.gm.tv/videos/gmtv-highlights/48356-the-mccanns-accuse-governemtn-of-neglecting-madeleine.html

A couple of things that stood out for me, apart from the obvious strength and dignity. Firstly I noticed Lorraine put a clear emphasis on the word 'Abducted' in her opening speech. No doubt that was pointedly aimed at the f*ckwits and retards who spammed her blog and twitter account. Secondly, for all those who again think that they can tell the marriage is on the rocks, I could clearly see the love in Kate's eyes every time she looked at Gerry. Perhaps if the rock dwellers had ever had such love in their own lives they might not have decended into the poisonous pits they are now in.
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by Pedro Silva on Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:04 am

Vee, thank you for post here the full interview´s link. I agree with you.

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Not sure how I feel about this post

Post by whymadeleine on Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:05 am

Our hearts go out to you Kate, but the truth is it's time to find
some peace...

By Esther Ranzten
Last updated at 12:11 AM on 29th April 2010
Dear Kate

Can it really be only three years since your little daughter Madeleine disappeared? It feels like a century ago
when her three-year-old face first began to haunt us.
Her angelic expression and solemn eyes engraved themselves on to
our hearts; they reached out to us from posters that went up everywhere,
from airports to village shops.
Even now, the questions remain. Could she still be alive? Worst
of all, is she the prisoner of some twisted individual? I know that must
be your deepest fear - indeed it doesn't bear thinking about - although
of course it must always be at the back of your mind.






Torment: Kate McCann has made a fresh
appeal for help finding her missing daughter Madeleine


Over the years we have shared your nightmares. In those early months,
as news story followed news story, we pored over the events of that
fatal evening she went missing. You must have relived those hours a
million times, and so have we.
So I hope it doesn't sound too harsh to suggest that three years
later, the world has moved on. Not because we have forgotten Maddie, nor
because we have lost sympathy with you and your family, but because the
pain we felt at the time has begun to numb and heal with time.
No doubt that's what motivated you to appear on GMTV yesterday.
To remind us. To shake us into caring again. Clearly you are still in
agony - perhaps, for you, time has even intensified it. As you and Gerry
publicly accuse the police of 'giving up', it is obvious that your
agony is caused not just by loss, but by not knowing if your darling
girl is dead or alive, safe or suffering.




Advice: Esther Rantzen believes the McCanns need
a positive memorial to celebrate Maddie's life

You are still tormented by the fact that nobody can answer your
questions, because Maddie has not been found, and may never be found.
Let us for a moment face the tragic truth. Maddie may not be
alive. How will you feel if one day her body is found? My guess - and it
can only be a guess because no one can truly know how you feel - is
that after the first terrible impact of shock and grief, you may even
feel a small glimmer of relief that at least she is at peace.
That is not in any way to diminish your terrible loss. It is
simply a human response to your current purgatory. No more guessing; no
more false hopes cruelly disappointed. Perhaps the fact of knowing might
bring with it the understanding that, at last, you might be able to
move on with your lives.
For at the moment you are still stuck exactly where you have been
for the past three years. As you say yourself: 'As a parent of an
abducted child, I can tell you that it is the most painful and agonising
experience you could ever imagine. My thoughts of the fear, confusion
and loss of love and security that my precious daughter has had to
endure are unbearable.'
So maybe if you knew the truth, no matter how tragic that truth
is, you might find it easier to bear.
You are not alone. Parents who lose children have told me how
important it is to have something, even a body, to centre their grief
on. I remember interviewing Winnie Johnson, mother of Keith Bennett.
Keith was one of Ian Brady's child victims, murdered and buried
somewhere on the Lancashire moors, the only child victim whose body was
never found.
Unlike you, Kate, Winnie has known for years that her child is
dead. But like you, she is still tormented by not knowing where he is.
Keith's murder took place 46 years ago. Yet only a couple of
months ago Winnie took a helicopter flight over Saddleworth Moor to
search for her boy's body yet again. And to pray for him.
She said: 'I know these moors go on for ever, but I know one day
we will find my Keith. I will never give up hope. I want him back. I
will fight for ever more until I find him and I hope I will find him
before I'm dead.'
Although Manchester police have called off their search for
Keith's body, Winnie is appealing for £20,000 to pay for a special
scanner powerful enough to find buried remains. After nearly half a
century of uncertainty, she still yearns to find him, to be released
from rage and pain, and be enabled to grieve.
Make no mistake, that need to mourn a lost child is one of the
most powerful emotions a mother can feel.




Agony: For Gerry and Kate McCann, pictured
during their interview on GMTV, the torture continues

I once made a television programme about still-born babies. At the
time, it was the practice to try to pretend the babies had never
existed. Fathers were told to go home and redecorate the nursery and
give away the baby clothes. Hospitals buried the tiny bodies in unmarked
graves.
There were no photographs taken, nothing to remind the parents of
their loss. Annihilating every trace of the child was considered the
kindest way to help a grieving mother cope. But it was terribly wrong.
Bereaved parents told me that years later their grief was as fresh as
ever; that they had constant dreams and flashbacks of the baby they had
lost.
So now the practice has changed completely. Doctors and midwives
encourage parents to create memorials, books and gardens for still-born
babies.
Grief, mourning and a carefully created memorial can bring
healing. Which brings me to another family in despair.
Seventeen years ago, when he was a toddler, James Bulger was
brutally murdered by two children, Robert Thompson and Jon Venables.
That murder is engraved on our national memory and broke his mother
Denise's heart.
For 15 of those years she has been unable to leave her home
alone. I have visited her there, in the house that had become a shrine
to James. All she had were constant reminders of his terrible death, not
of his life. 'He was such a positive little boy,' she told me, 'I'd
love him to have something positive to celebrate him with.'
'Be assured, we have not forgotten Madeleine, or you'


So I suggested to her that we could create a special memorial to
James, a project on Merseyside, her home town, to help children who have
been badly bullied. Run by the Red Balloon charity, it could be called
James Bulger House.
When Denise visited a Red Balloon project with me and saw their
fantastic work in giving traumatised children their lives back, she
leapt at the idea of a similar project in her son's name. 'I would love
my children to have a positive memory of James,' she told me.
James Bulger House is about to open now; there are already
children on its waiting list. And on what would have been James's 18th
birthday, Denise took 18 red balloons to his graveside.
Why is this relevant to your own terrible heartache, Kate? Well,
what I am suggesting is that you and Gerry need a similarly positive
memorial to celebrate Maddie's life, too. Not because I am assuming she
is dead, but because when we last met I saw how frail you are, and how
unhappy. And no wonder.
I know that you and Gerry are constantly with parents of missing
children who, like yourselves, are lost in the no man's land between
grief and hope.
The work has inevitably immersed you in the hideous world of
child pornography and sexual exploitation, because that is often the
motive of those who abduct children. You say that now you know about
'the unbelievable existence of such a horrifying activity and its
vastness in our socalled civilised and "child-loving" society', your
eyes have been opened to a terrifying new world.
With that nightmare constantly before your eyes, no wonder you
accuse the police of 'giving up' on Maddie. Let no one judge you harshly
for keeping the flicker of hope alive in your hearts.
But alongside your campaign to tighten laws against child
pornography, why not also create a Madeleine McCann charity - one that
would not simply fund the search for your lost daughter, and others like
her, but which would also help children in other distressing
situations?
It could be medically based - perhaps as Gerry is a consultant
cardiologist, it might work for children with heart disease. Or perhaps
it could provide respite for families battling with disability - for
example, the thousands of children who spend their exhausted lives
helping to care for a disabled parent, day in day out.
These are only suggestions. You as a GP and Gerry as a consultant
must already know many other ways in which you could give practical
support to other children, in Maddie's name. And the happiness you
create would surely give you both the strength to heal the past, and
optimism to face the future.
In the meantime, be assured, we have not forgotten Maddie, or
you. But we recognise, in your anger, that time has stood still for you.

And although we would not wish you to lose your commitment, we
would also like to feel that you find comfort in the knowledge that
Maddie's name will live on, and will contribute happiness to many other
children's lives - wherever she is.
Wishing you happiness as ever,


Esther


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1269641/ESTHER-RANTZEN-Our-hearts-Kate-McCann-truth-time-peace-.html?ito=feeds-newsxml
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by dianeh on Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:00 pm

WhyMadeleine.

It is a very sad article. But I do think Esther makes a good point. However, the McCanns have already created a positive legacy from their terrible loss in the form of the missing child alert.

Personally, I think that to start a charity would be too much for them at the moment. But possibly in the future, a new charity to help the victims of child trafficking/abudction etc or something like that would be a fitting memorial to Madeleine and what she has been through. And that would be fitting whether she is found alive, proven to be dead, or never found at all. It is just that the time is not right for them yet.
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by Peaceful1 on Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:48 pm

It is sad yes reading that.

I am sad also, that just 20 grand will buy a scanner to hopefully find Keith Bennett's remains and nobody has found that money!
There are so many millionaires who surely could help this poor woman?? 20 grand is a drop in the ocean for some.

Look at how many people win the lotto, and then waste it. It p*sses me off to see sme people win the lotto and just blow it on booze, drugs, holidays , cars etc..
Sorry, having a rant coz I feel helpless!
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by dianeh on Thu Apr 29, 2010 3:15 pm

Why does she have to buy it? Why cant it be lent by Scotland Yard or some other force under the condition that it be returned when it is needed. That was my first thought. Those machines area available to multiple police forces and are most often not in use, just sitting idle. it could even be done as training exercise where people from different forces are sent out to 'practice', all the while helping Mrs Bennett find the remains of her son.
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by Peaceful1 on Thu Apr 29, 2010 8:59 pm

Diane, that makes it even worse. These scanners are sitting idle??
FFS....why cant some police force get off their ____ and use them??
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by Catkins on Thu Apr 29, 2010 9:41 pm

whymadeleine wrote:Our hearts go out to you Kate, but the truth is it's time to find
some peace...

By Esther Ranzten
Last updated at 12:11 AM on 29th April 2010
Dear Kate

Can it really be only three years since your little daughter Madeleine disappeared? It feels like a century ago
when her three-year-old face first began to haunt us.
Her angelic expression and solemn eyes engraved themselves on to
our hearts; they reached out to us from posters that went up everywhere,
from airports to village shops.
Even now, the questions remain. Could she still be alive? Worst
of all, is she the prisoner of some twisted individual? I know that must
be your deepest fear - indeed it doesn't bear thinking about - although
of course it must always be at the back of your mind.






Torment: Kate McCann has made a fresh
appeal for help finding her missing daughter Madeleine


Over the years we have shared your nightmares. In those early months,
as news story followed news story, we pored over the events of that
fatal evening she went missing. You must have relived those hours a
million times, and so have we.
So I hope it doesn't sound too harsh to suggest that three years
later, the world has moved on. Not because we have forgotten Maddie, nor
because we have lost sympathy with you and your family, but because the
pain we felt at the time has begun to numb and heal with time.
No doubt that's what motivated you to appear on GMTV yesterday.
To remind us. To shake us into caring again. Clearly you are still in
agony - perhaps, for you, time has even intensified it. As you and Gerry
publicly accuse the police of 'giving up', it is obvious that your
agony is caused not just by loss, but by not knowing if your darling
girl is dead or alive, safe or suffering.




Advice: Esther Rantzen believes the McCanns need
a positive memorial to celebrate Maddie's life

You are still tormented by the fact that nobody can answer your
questions, because Maddie has not been found, and may never be found.
Let us for a moment face the tragic truth. Maddie may not be
alive. How will you feel if one day her body is found? My guess - and it
can only be a guess because no one can truly know how you feel - is
that after the first terrible impact of shock and grief, you may even
feel a small glimmer of relief that at least she is at peace.
That is not in any way to diminish your terrible loss. It is
simply a human response to your current purgatory. No more guessing; no
more false hopes cruelly disappointed. Perhaps the fact of knowing might
bring with it the understanding that, at last, you might be able to
move on with your lives.
For at the moment you are still stuck exactly where you have been
for the past three years. As you say yourself: 'As a parent of an
abducted child, I can tell you that it is the most painful and agonising
experience you could ever imagine. My thoughts of the fear, confusion
and loss of love and security that my precious daughter has had to
endure are unbearable.'
So maybe if you knew the truth, no matter how tragic that truth
is, you might find it easier to bear.
You are not alone. Parents who lose children have told me how
important it is to have something, even a body, to centre their grief
on. I remember interviewing Winnie Johnson, mother of Keith Bennett.
Keith was one of Ian Brady's child victims, murdered and buried
somewhere on the Lancashire moors, the only child victim whose body was
never found.
Unlike you, Kate, Winnie has known for years that her child is
dead. But like you, she is still tormented by not knowing where he is.
Keith's murder took place 46 years ago. Yet only a couple of
months ago Winnie took a helicopter flight over Saddleworth Moor to
search for her boy's body yet again. And to pray for him.
She said: 'I know these moors go on for ever, but I know one day
we will find my Keith. I will never give up hope. I want him back. I
will fight for ever more until I find him and I hope I will find him
before I'm dead.'
Although Manchester police have called off their search for
Keith's body, Winnie is appealing for £20,000 to pay for a special
scanner powerful enough to find buried remains. After nearly half a
century of uncertainty, she still yearns to find him, to be released
from rage and pain, and be enabled to grieve.
Make no mistake, that need to mourn a lost child is one of the
most powerful emotions a mother can feel.




Agony: For Gerry and Kate McCann, pictured
during their interview on GMTV, the torture continues

I once made a television programme about still-born babies. At the
time, it was the practice to try to pretend the babies had never
existed. Fathers were told to go home and redecorate the nursery and
give away the baby clothes. Hospitals buried the tiny bodies in unmarked
graves.
There were no photographs taken, nothing to remind the parents of
their loss. Annihilating every trace of the child was considered the
kindest way to help a grieving mother cope. But it was terribly wrong.
Bereaved parents told me that years later their grief was as fresh as
ever; that they had constant dreams and flashbacks of the baby they had
lost.
So now the practice has changed completely. Doctors and midwives
encourage parents to create memorials, books and gardens for still-born
babies.
Grief, mourning and a carefully created memorial can bring
healing. Which brings me to another family in despair.
Seventeen years ago, when he was a toddler, James Bulger was
brutally murdered by two children, Robert Thompson and Jon Venables.
That murder is engraved on our national memory and broke his mother
Denise's heart.
For 15 of those years she has been unable to leave her home
alone. I have visited her there, in the house that had become a shrine
to James. All she had were constant reminders of his terrible death, not
of his life. 'He was such a positive little boy,' she told me, 'I'd
love him to have something positive to celebrate him with.'
'Be assured, we have not forgotten Madeleine, or you'


So I suggested to her that we could create a special memorial to
James, a project on Merseyside, her home town, to help children who have
been badly bullied. Run by the Red Balloon charity, it could be called
James Bulger House.
When Denise visited a Red Balloon project with me and saw their
fantastic work in giving traumatised children their lives back, she
leapt at the idea of a similar project in her son's name. 'I would love
my children to have a positive memory of James,' she told me.
James Bulger House is about to open now; there are already
children on its waiting list. And on what would have been James's 18th
birthday, Denise took 18 red balloons to his graveside.
Why is this relevant to your own terrible heartache, Kate? Well,
what I am suggesting is that you and Gerry need a similarly positive
memorial to celebrate Maddie's life, too. Not because I am assuming she
is dead, but because when we last met I saw how frail you are, and how
unhappy. And no wonder.
I know that you and Gerry are constantly with parents of missing
children who, like yourselves, are lost in the no man's land between
grief and hope.
The work has inevitably immersed you in the hideous world of
child pornography and sexual exploitation, because that is often the
motive of those who abduct children. You say that now you know about
'the unbelievable existence of such a horrifying activity and its
vastness in our socalled civilised and "child-loving" society', your
eyes have been opened to a terrifying new world.
With that nightmare constantly before your eyes, no wonder you
accuse the police of 'giving up' on Maddie. Let no one judge you harshly
for keeping the flicker of hope alive in your hearts.
But alongside your campaign to tighten laws against child
pornography, why not also create a Madeleine McCann charity - one that
would not simply fund the search for your lost daughter, and others like
her, but which would also help children in other distressing
situations?
It could be medically based - perhaps as Gerry is a consultant
cardiologist, it might work for children with heart disease. Or perhaps
it could provide respite for families battling with disability - for
example, the thousands of children who spend their exhausted lives
helping to care for a disabled parent, day in day out.
These are only suggestions. You as a GP and Gerry as a consultant
must already know many other ways in which you could give practical
support to other children, in Maddie's name. And the happiness you
create would surely give you both the strength to heal the past, and
optimism to face the future.
In the meantime, be assured, we have not forgotten Maddie, or
you. But we recognise, in your anger, that time has stood still for you.

And although we would not wish you to lose your commitment, we
would also like to feel that you find comfort in the knowledge that
Maddie's name will live on, and will contribute happiness to many other
children's lives - wherever she is.
Wishing you happiness as ever,


Esther


[url=http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1269641/ESTHER-RANTZEN-Our-hearts-Kate-McCann-truth-time-peace-.html?ito=feeds-newsxml
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1269641/ESTHER-RANTZEN-Our-hearts-Kate-McCann-truth-time-peace-.html?ito=feeds-newsxml[/quote[/url]]

I think she probably mean't well.....but I wonder if she would feel the same if it were her daughter or granddaughter....
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by Pedro Silva on Thu Apr 29, 2010 10:02 pm

Esther, with all do respect, but I disagree with you when you say "time to find some peace". Think this: how can they find some peace, if their sweet daughter is still missing?" This will only end when this sweet little girl is found / returned to her home.

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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by maria theresa on Fri Apr 30, 2010 1:08 am

They will never find real peace until they know what has happened to Madeleine; that's true. However, I do think maybe Esther's idea is a good one, for three reasons.
First, it would ensure that Madeleine's name lived on, that she was never forgotten, but WITHOUT in any way stopping or hindering their commitment to the search. It would have to be clear that the campaign continued, always and until the truth is know. It might be best if the chosen focus for the "memorial" were to be one linked with missing children.
Secondly, it would also give them a focus for the energy (which springs from their love of Madeleine) other than the search alone. That might be good as therapy for them in their heartbreak.
Thirdly, it would greatly benefit whichever group of children they chose as the focus of their efforts. To have Madeleine's name attached, as well as her parents, would make it one of the best known beacons for children.

The time may not yet be quite right, but I think the idea is excellent. It is, of course, for Kate and Gerry to consider these things and make up their minds. Nobody has the right to dictate anything at all to them.

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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by whymadeleine on Fri Apr 30, 2010 8:01 am

[quote="Catkins"]
whymadeleine wrote:Our hearts go out to you Kate, but the truth is it's time to find
some peace...

By Esther Ranzten
Last updated at 12:11 AM on 29th April 2010
Dear Kate

Can it really be only three years since your little daughter Madeleine disappeared? It feels like a century ago
when her three-year-old face first began to haunt us.
Her angelic expression and solemn eyes engraved themselves on to
our hearts; they reached out to us from posters that went up everywhere,
from airports to village shops.
Even now, the questions remain. Could she still be alive? Worst
of all, is she the prisoner of some twisted individual? I know that must
be your deepest fear - indeed it doesn't bear thinking about - although
of course it must always be at the back of your mind.






Torment: Kate McCann has made a fresh
appeal for help finding her missing daughter Madeleine


Over the years we have shared your nightmares. In those early months,
as news story followed news story, we pored over the events of that
fatal evening she went missing. You must have relived those hours a
million times, and so have we.
So I hope it doesn't sound too harsh to suggest that three years
later, the world has moved on. Not because we have forgotten Maddie, nor
because we have lost sympathy with you and your family, but because the
pain we felt at the time has begun to numb and heal with time.
No doubt that's what motivated you to appear on GMTV yesterday.
To remind us. To shake us into caring again. Clearly you are still in
agony - perhaps, for you, time has even intensified it. As you and Gerry
publicly accuse the police of 'giving up', it is obvious that your
agony is caused not just by loss, but by not knowing if your darling
girl is dead or alive, safe or suffering.




Advice: Esther Rantzen believes the McCanns need
a positive memorial to celebrate Maddie's life

You are still tormented by the fact that nobody can answer your
questions, because Maddie has not been found, and may never be found.
Let us for a moment face the tragic truth. Maddie may not be
alive. How will you feel if one day her body is found? My guess - and it
can only be a guess because no one can truly know how you feel - is
that after the first terrible impact of shock and grief, you may even
feel a small glimmer of relief that at least she is at peace.
That is not in any way to diminish your terrible loss. It is
simply a human response to your current purgatory. No more guessing; no
more false hopes cruelly disappointed. Perhaps the fact of knowing might
bring with it the understanding that, at last, you might be able to
move on with your lives.
For at the moment you are still stuck exactly where you have been
for the past three years. As you say yourself: 'As a parent of an
abducted child, I can tell you that it is the most painful and agonising
experience you could ever imagine. My thoughts of the fear, confusion
and loss of love and security that my precious daughter has had to
endure are unbearable.'
So maybe if you knew the truth, no matter how tragic that truth
is, you might find it easier to bear.
You are not alone. Parents who lose children have told me how
important it is to have something, even a body, to centre their grief
on. I remember interviewing Winnie Johnson, mother of Keith Bennett.
Keith was one of Ian Brady's child victims, murdered and buried
somewhere on the Lancashire moors, the only child victim whose body was
never found.
Unlike you, Kate, Winnie has known for years that her child is
dead. But like you, she is still tormented by not knowing where he is.
Keith's murder took place 46 years ago. Yet only a couple of
months ago Winnie took a helicopter flight over Saddleworth Moor to
search for her boy's body yet again. And to pray for him.
She said: 'I know these moors go on for ever, but I know one day
we will find my Keith. I will never give up hope. I want him back. I
will fight for ever more until I find him and I hope I will find him
before I'm dead.'
Although Manchester police have called off their search for
Keith's body, Winnie is appealing for £20,000 to pay for a special
scanner powerful enough to find buried remains. After nearly half a
century of uncertainty, she still yearns to find him, to be released
from rage and pain, and be enabled to grieve.
Make no mistake, that need to mourn a lost child is one of the
most powerful emotions a mother can feel.




Agony: For Gerry and Kate McCann, pictured
during their interview on GMTV, the torture continues

I once made a television programme about still-born babies. At the
time, it was the practice to try to pretend the babies had never
existed. Fathers were told to go home and redecorate the nursery and
give away the baby clothes. Hospitals buried the tiny bodies in unmarked
graves.
There were no photographs taken, nothing to remind the parents of
their loss. Annihilating every trace of the child was considered the
kindest way to help a grieving mother cope. But it was terribly wrong.
Bereaved parents told me that years later their grief was as fresh as
ever; that they had constant dreams and flashbacks of the baby they had
lost.
So now the practice has changed completely. Doctors and midwives
encourage parents to create memorials, books and gardens for still-born
babies.
Grief, mourning and a carefully created memorial can bring
healing. Which brings me to another family in despair.
Seventeen years ago, when he was a toddler, James Bulger was
brutally murdered by two children, Robert Thompson and Jon Venables.
That murder is engraved on our national memory and broke his mother
Denise's heart.
For 15 of those years she has been unable to leave her home
alone. I have visited her there, in the house that had become a shrine
to James. All she had were constant reminders of his terrible death, not
of his life. 'He was such a positive little boy,' she told me, 'I'd
love him to have something positive to celebrate him with.'
'Be assured, we have not forgotten Madeleine, or you'


So I suggested to her that we could create a special memorial to
James, a project on Merseyside, her home town, to help children who have
been badly bullied. Run by the Red Balloon charity, it could be called
James Bulger House.
When Denise visited a Red Balloon project with me and saw their
fantastic work in giving traumatised children their lives back, she
leapt at the idea of a similar project in her son's name. 'I would love
my children to have a positive memory of James,' she told me.
James Bulger House is about to open now; there are already
children on its waiting list. And on what would have been James's 18th
birthday, Denise took 18 red balloons to his graveside.
Why is this relevant to your own terrible heartache, Kate? Well,
what I am suggesting is that you and Gerry need a similarly positive
memorial to celebrate Maddie's life, too. Not because I am assuming she
is dead, but because when we last met I saw how frail you are, and how
unhappy. And no wonder.
I know that you and Gerry are constantly with parents of missing
children who, like yourselves, are lost in the no man's land between
grief and hope.
The work has inevitably immersed you in the hideous world of
child pornography and sexual exploitation, because that is often the
motive of those who abduct children. You say that now you know about
'the unbelievable existence of such a horrifying activity and its
vastness in our socalled civilised and "child-loving" society', your
eyes have been opened to a terrifying new world.
With that nightmare constantly before your eyes, no wonder you
accuse the police of 'giving up' on Maddie. Let no one judge you harshly
for keeping the flicker of hope alive in your hearts.
But alongside your campaign to tighten laws against child
pornography, why not also create a Madeleine McCann charity - one that
would not simply fund the search for your lost daughter, and others like
her, but which would also help children in other distressing
situations?
It could be medically based - perhaps as Gerry is a consultant
cardiologist, it might work for children with heart disease. Or perhaps
it could provide respite for families battling with disability - for
example, the thousands of children who spend their exhausted lives
helping to care for a disabled parent, day in day out.
These are only suggestions. You as a GP and Gerry as a consultant
must already know many other ways in which you could give practical
support to other children, in Maddie's name. And the happiness you
create would surely give you both the strength to heal the past, and
optimism to face the future.
In the meantime, be assured, we have not forgotten Maddie, or
you. But we recognise, in your anger, that time has stood still for you.

And although we would not wish you to lose your commitment, we
would also like to feel that you find comfort in the knowledge that
Maddie's name will live on, and will contribute happiness to many other
children's lives - wherever she is.
Wishing you happiness as ever,


Esther


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1269641/ESTHER-RANTZEN-Our-hearts-Kate-McCann-truth-time-peace-.html?ito=feeds-newsxml[/quote]

I think she probably mean't well.....but I wonder if she would feel the same if it were her daughter or granddaughter....

Exactly

I think it was more her timing that threw me, insensitive is an understatement ..
ok no time would be the best time to tell a parent living in limbo to just get on with the rest of your life
but days before her anniversary .. when they has the rest of the year to grow stronger and think about all these suggestions that may help them get through another year .. Why should they give up ?

Madeleine is already an icon for missing & exploited children, first we had Code Madeleine, then the EU amber alert/child alert we have had fundraisers for other missing children & adults. Kate & Gerry McCann are an inspiration to us all, they have opened up our eyes to what is going on in the world around us .. sooo Esther
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by whymadeleine on Sat May 01, 2010 6:28 am

McCanns welcome European alert system

Published on Fri Apr 30 19:45:00 BST 2010

Kate and Gerry McCann, from Leicestershire, welcomed
progress on developing a Europe-wide alert system for missing children.


The couple from Rothley, speaking days before the third anniversary of the disappearance of their daughter
Madeleine, said they were "delighted and relieved" that the cross-border scheme, boosted by one million euros
of EU funding, was now going ahead.Euro-MPs overwhelmingly backed the idea last year and endorsement from EU government ministers six months ago turned it into official EU policy.Now the EU funding has paid for studies
into the details of cross-border co-operation, and the UK part of the missing child early warning network will be launched on May 25 - International Missing Children's Day."We are delighted and relieved that this system is being introduced," said the McCanns in a statement."We very much welcome this new initiative and we hope
that a truly integrated European alert system can now be developed and used to combat child abduction. "The first hours after a child goes missing are crucial and if such international co-operation stops just one child from being abducted, then all the work involved will havebeen worthwhile."We remain very grateful to those European
parliamentarians and officials who supported us in our efforts to highlight the obvious benefits of such a structure."Madeleine McCann went missing during a family holiday in Praia da Luz, southern Portugal, on May 3 2007.The couple later began campaigning for Europe to adopt a US-style system able to track abducted youngsters
across the continent if necessary.

http://www.peterboroughtoday.co.uk/news/national-news/mccanns_welcome_european_alert_system_1_625016

Esther
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by Peaceful1 on Sat May 01, 2010 1:42 pm

They will never find peace until they know what happened to Madeleine or where she is.
They cant give up. If they did, and years later Madeleine was found by accident, and alive, how would they then feel?
No, they cant move on, the can live each day one at a time, but never move on until Madeleine is found.
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by Pedro Silva on Sat May 01, 2010 7:02 pm

Wise words Peaceful, which I agree my friend.

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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by AlexG on Tue May 04, 2010 2:40 pm

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Last edited by AlexG on Tue May 18, 2010 2:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: GMTV interview, in full.

Post by Pedro Silva on Tue May 04, 2010 7:40 pm

I say again: without evidence otherwise given to me by the PI´s, she is probably still out there waiting to be found, she can still be found, Take a good look at Shawn Hornbeck, Natasha Kampush. Jaycee Lee Duggard. That is the base in which we all are working. So, in one thing I agree: distractions are not need nor welcome.

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